Data from: First evidence of diverging migration and overwintering strategies in glaucous gulls (Larus hyperboreus) from the Canadian Arctic

When using this dataset, please cite the original article.

Baak JE, Patterson A, Gilchrist HG, Elliott KH. 2021. First evidence of diverging migration and overwintering strategies in glaucous gulls (Larus hyperboreus) from the Canadian Arctic. Anim Migr. 8:98-109. doi:10.1515/ami-2020-0107

Additionally, please cite the Movebank data package:

Baak JE, Patterson A, Gilchrist HG, Elliott KH (2021) Data from: First evidence of diverging migration and overwintering strategies in glaucous gulls (Larus hyperboreus) from the Canadian Arctic. Movebank Data Repository. doi:10.5441/001/1.tj948m64
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Package Identifier doi:10.5441/001/1.tj948m64  
 
Abstract Many seabird populations differ in their migration strategies, where individuals travel in different directions to separate wintering areas. These migratory strategies may expose individuals to different threats, thus understanding migratory connectivity is crucial to assess risks to populations. Glaucous gulls (Larus hyperboreus) are generalist predators with flexible migratory behaviour that may alter these behaviours in response to climate change and anthropogenic activities, such as access to landfills, yet little is known about their migration. We deployed GPS and GLS tracking devices on glaucous gulls from Coats Island, Nunavut, Canada to obtain the first insights into their migration and habitat use outside of the breeding season. Gulls used two migration strategies during the non-breeding season, where one migrated as far as the Sea of Okhotsk in the Pacific and the remainder (n = 7) wintered in the North Atlantic. Gulls primarily overwintered in pelagic (56%) and coastal (38%) habitats. While in coastal habitats, one gull visited one landfill once, but visits increased with a 1 km and 3 km buffer, suggesting that urban glaucous gulls primarily used non-landfill habitats. This research can be used as a baseline to explore changes in migratory behaviour and inform future conservation of Arctic-breeding gulls.
Keywords animal movement, animal tracking, Arctic, avian migration, geolocator, glaucous gull, gps logger, Larus hyperboreus, light-level logger, seabirds,

Glaucous gull Elliott Coats-gps View File Details
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Glaucous gull Elliott Coats-light-levels View File Details
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Glaucous gull Elliott Coats-tracks View File Details
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Glaucous gull Elliott Coats-twilights View File Details
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Glaucous gull Elliott Coats-reference-data View File Details
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