Data from: Ecological opportunity leads to the emergence of an alternative behavioural phenotype in a tropical bird

When using this dataset, please cite the original article.

Touchton JM, Wikelski M (2015) Ecological opportunity leads to the emergence of an alternative behavioural phenotype in a tropical bird. Journal of Animal Ecology. doi:10.1111/1365-2656.12341

Additionally, please cite the Movebank data package:

Touchton JM (2015) Data from: Ecological opportunity leads to the emergence of an alternative behavioural phenotype in a tropical bird. Movebank Data Repository. doi:10.5441/001/1.f7j8vt43
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Package Identifier doi:10.5441/001/1.f7j8vt43  
 
Abstract 1. Loss of a dominant competitor can open ecological opportunities. Ecological opportunities are considered prerequisites for adaptive radiations. Nonetheless, initiation of diversification in response to ecological opportunity is seldom observed, so we know little about the stages by which behavioural variation either increases or coalesces into distinct phenotypes. 2. Here, a natural experiment showed that in a tropical island’s guild of army-ant following birds, a new behavioural phenotype emerged in subordinate spotted antbirds (Hylophylax naevioides) after the socially dominant ocellated antbird (Phaenostictus mcleannani) died out. 3. Individuals with this behavioural phenotype are less territorial; instead, they roam in search of ant swarms where they feed in locations from which dominant competitors formerly excluded them. Roaming individuals fledge more young than territorial individuals. 4. We conclude that ecological opportunity arising from species loss may enhance the success of alternative behavioural phenotypes and can favour further intraspecific diversification in life-history traits in surviving species.
Keywords Alternative behavioural phenotypes, ant-following birds, behavioural diversification, competitive release, ecological opportunity, individual differences, Hylophylax naevioides, spotted antbirds, territorial breakdown,

Spotted antbirds in Panama (data from Touchton and Wikelski 2015) View File Details
Download: README.txt ( 10.09Kb )
Download: Spotted antbirds in Panama (data from Touchton and Wikelski 2015).csv ( 634.2Kb )
To the extent possible under law, the authors have waived all copyright and related or neighboring rights to this data.  



Spotted antbirds in Panama (data from Touchton and Wikelski 2015)-reference-data View File Details
Download: README.txt ( 10.09Kb )
Download: Spotted antbirds in Panama (data from Touchton and Wikelski 2015)-reference-data.csv ( 9.351Kb )
To the extent possible under law, the authors have waived all copyright and related or neighboring rights to this data.  


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