Data from: Multidimensional differentiation in foraging resource use during breeding of two sympatric raptors: space, habitat type, time and food

When using this dataset, please cite the original article.

Friedemann G, Leshem Y, Kerem L, Shacham B, Bar-Massada A, McClain KM, Bohrer G, Izhaki I (2016) Multidimensional differentiation in foraging resource use during breeding of two sympatric top predators. Scientific Reports 6, 35031. doi:10.1038/srep35031

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Friedemann G, Leshem Y, Izhaki I (2016) Data from: Multidimensional differentiation in foraging resource use during breeding of two sympatric raptors: space, habitat type, time and food. Movebank Data Repository. doi:10.5441/001/1.c6q8353q
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Package Identifier doi:10.5441/001/1.c6q8353q  
 
Abstract Ecologically-similar species were found to develop specific strategies to partition their resources, leading to niche differentiation and divergence, in order to avoid interspecific competition. Our study determines multi-dimensional differentiation of two sympatric top-predators, long-legged buzzards (LLB) and short-toed eagles (STE), which recently became sympatric during their breeding season in the Judean Foothills, Israel. By combining information from comprehensive diet and movement analyses we found four dimensions of differentiation: (1) Geographic foraging area: LLB tended to forage relatively close to their nests (2.35 ± 0.62 km), while STE forage far from their nest (13.03 ± 2.20 km); (2) Foraging-habitat type: LLBs forage at low natural vegetation, avoiding cultivated fields, whereas STEs forage in cultivated fields, avoiding low natural vegetation; (3) Diurnal dynamics of foraging: LLBs are uniformly active during daytime, whereas STEs activity peaks in the early afternoon; and (4) Food-niche: while both species largely rely on reptiles (47.8% and 76.3% for LLB and STE, respectively), LLB had a more diverse diet and consumed significantly higher percentages of lizards, while STE consumed significantly higher percentages of snakes. Our results suggest that this multidimensional differentiation allows the spatial coexistence of these two dense populations in the study area.
Keywords Buteo rufinus, Circaetus gallicus, diel, ecological release, flight corridors, food niche differentiation, foraging area, GPS tags, habitat differentiation, interspecific competition, long-legged buzzard, remote sensing, short-toed eagle, spatial segregation,

Movements of long-legged buzzards and short-toed eagles View File Details
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Movements of long-legged buzzards and short-toed eagles-reference-data View File Details
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