Data from: Migratory connectivity at high latitudes: Sabine’s gulls (Xema sabini) from a colony in the Canadian High Arctic migrate to different oceans

When using this dataset, please cite the original article.

Davis SE, Maftei M, Mallory ML (2016) Migratory connectivity at high latitudes: Sabine’s gulls (Xema sabini) from a colony in the Canadian high Arctic migrate to different oceans. PLOS ONE 11(12): e0166043. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0166043

Additionally, please cite the Movebank data package:

Davis SE, Maftei M, Mallory ML (2016) Data from: Migratory connectivity at high latitudes: Sabine’s gulls (Xema sabini) from a colony in the Canadian High Arctic migrate to different oceans. Movebank Data Repository. doi:10.5441/001/1.c745vb70
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Package Identifier doi:10.5441/001/1.c745vb70  
 
Abstract The world's Arctic latitudes are some of the most recently colonized by birds, and an understanding of the migratory connectivity of circumpolar species offers insights into the mechanisms of range expansion and speciation. Migratory divides exist for many birds, however for many taxa it is unclear where such boundaries lie, and to what extent these affect the connectivity of species breeding across their ranges. Sabine’s gulls (Xema sabini) have a patchy, circumpolar breeding distribution and overwinter in two ecologically similar areas in different ocean basins: the Humboldt Current off the coast of Peru in the Pacific, and the Benguela Current off the coasts of South Africa and Namibia in the Atlantic. We used geolocators to track Sabine’s gulls breeding at a colony in the Canadian High Arctic to determine their migratory pathways and wintering sites. Our study provides evidence that birds from this breeding site disperse to both the Pacific and Atlantic oceans during the non-breeding season, which suggests that a migratory divide for this species exists in the Nearctic. Remarkably, members of one mated pair wintered in opposite oceans. Our results ultimately suggest that colonization of favorable breeding habitat may be one of the strongest drivers of range expansion in the High Arctic.
Keywords animal movement, animal tracking, avian migration, light-level loggers, migratory connectivity, MODIS, Sabine's gull, sea surface temperature, Xema sabini,

Migration of Sabine's gulls from the Canadian High Arctic View File Details
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Migration of Sabine's gulls from the Canadian High Arctic-reference-data View File Details
Download: README.txt ( 11.82Kb )
Download: Migration of Sabine's gulls from the Canadian High Arctic-reference-data.csv ( 14.44Kb )
To the extent possible under law, the authors have waived all copyright and related or neighboring rights to this data.  


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