Data from: Wind estimation based on thermal soaring of birds

When using this dataset, please cite the original article.

Weinzierl R, Bohrer G, Kranstauber B, Fiedler W, Wikelski M, Flack A (2016) Wind estimation based on thermal soaring of birds. Ecology and Evolution 6(24): 8706–8718. doi:10.1002/ece3.2585

Additionally, please cite the Movebank data package:

Weinzierl R, Bohrer G, Kranstauber B, Fiedler W, Schaefle W, Wikelski M, Flack A (2017) Data from: Wind estimation based on thermal soaring of birds. Movebank Data Repository. doi:10.5441/001/1.bj96m274
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Package Identifier doi:10.5441/001/1.bj96m274  
 
Abstract The flight performance of birds is strongly affected by the dynamic state of the atmosphere at the birds' locations. Studies of flight and its impact on the movement ecology of birds must consider the wind to help us understand aerodynamics and bird flight strategies. Here, we introduce a systematic approach to evaluate wind speed and direction from the high-frequency GPS recordings from bird-borne tags during thermalling flight. Our method assumes that a fixed horizontal mean wind speed during a short (18 seconds, 19 GPS fixes) flight segment with a constant turn angle along a closed loop, characteristic of thermalling flight, will generate a fixed drift for each consequent location. We use a maximum-likelihood approach to estimate that drift and to determine the wind and airspeeds at the birds' flight locations. We also provide error estimates for these GPS-derived wind speed estimates. We validate our approach by comparing its wind estimates with the mid-resolution weather reanalysis data from ECMWF, and by examining independent wind estimates from pairs of birds in a large dataset of GPS-tagged migrating storks that were flying in close proximity. Our approach provides accurate and unbiased observations of wind speed and additional detailed information on vertical winds and uplift structure. These precise measurements are otherwise rare and hard to obtain and will broaden our understanding of atmospheric conditions, flight aerodynamics, and bird flight strategies. With an increasing number of GPS-tracked animals, we may soon be able to use birds to inform us about the atmosphere they are flying through and thus improve future ecological and environmental studies.
Keywords animal movement, animal tracking, avian migration, Ciconia ciconia, ECMWF, Env-DATA, GSM telemetry, GPS logger, Movebank, white stork,

Fall migration of white storks in 2014-acceleration View File Details
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Fall migration of white storks in 2014-gps.csv View File Details
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Fall migration of white storks in 2014-reference-data View File Details
Download: README.txt ( 17.89Kb )
Download: Fall migration of white storks in 2014-reference-data.csv ( 34.94Kb )
To the extent possible under law, the authors have waived all copyright and related or neighboring rights to this data.  


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